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The "World Domination 201" writing made an impact on some parts of the Free Software community, including myself as I found myself in agreement.


Free Software Foundation, or FSF for short, is one of the most controversial information technology related organizations. Some people hate it and some people love it. Neither can change the fact that it has had a tremendous influence on what many today tend to call the "open source" phenomenon which is in fact lying on the very foundations that the FSF represents: Free Software and the Free Software philosophy.


WorldChanging isn't a real user's guide. This collection of articles is not a collection of HOWTOs, it is a collection of inspiring examples supporting a message: The tools, both technological and social, to create a better, greener, healthier, sustainable, more human-friendly future are available, and using them won't make us uncomfortable. We can ignore the tools, and let our planet go down the drain, or we can decide to use them.


It seems that Sun Microsystems are considering GPL-ing Solaris. What's even more interesting is they are thinking of using the controversial version 3 of the license, which has yet to be published. This follows a post last January by Sun's Jonathan Schwartz where he indicated that Sun were looking into the use of the GPLv3 for Solaris.


This may seem like a bold statement. Apple's just released iPhone is not only very attractive as we would expect from an Apple product, but includes some impressive features and specifications. It's probably unrealistic to claim that anything currently available on the market competes with this offering. However, is it really a revolution in mobile communication devices?


Just before new year, on December 31st 2006 the Free Culture Foundation site has been launched. The site appears to be mimicking the Free Software Foundation in form and also presents four core freedoms on which the Free Culture Movement should be based, to use, create, share and learn. On Libervis.com we have been discussing the need for defining core principles of the Free Culture Movement before and the FCF might just be filling the gap. Here is the press release:

For Freedom in 2007


I wish everyone reading this site, from regular members to anonymous readers, the very best new year and all the success and happiness you desire. In light of that I wish everyone be free as they deserve to be and I wish for 2007 to be the year of wins for freedom rather than losses. Let's defeat DRM this year. Let's make Free Software ubiquitous! Let's spread the Free Culture far and wide, from music to drawings to movies that escapes the hands of senseless restrictiveness.

It's a discussion site


I have noticed that some people outside Libervis don't quite understand what Libervis is. For example:

LWN wrote:

Of hypocrisy and the FSF (Libervis)

Libervis asks why the FSF sites run Debian when Debian is not on the FSF's list of free distributions.

Which was linked to from the BLAG forums as "Bad press for libervis".

Libervis never asked anything, it's a discussion site. Someone asked something on Libervis, which is quite different.


There is some significant symbolic and historical value in the gesture that the popular Time Magazine exercised this month. It may be remembered as one of the signs of historic change for decades to come.


ECMA has approved Microsofts Office OpenXML and is about to submit it to the ISO/IEC for consideration as an open standard.

However, as it currently stands, this format cannot be considered a proper Open Standard and approving it for standardization is therefore a bad idea. ODF Alliance has issued a facts sheet stating certain points which describe the ECMA process and reasons why OpenXML can hardly be considered an Open Standard.