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Project of the month


Here is a nice way to contribute to Free Software projects that you like and use frequently, and get a bit of promotion for your blog in return.

Introduction to Freedom


If you want to know what freedom is, read on, we will define freedom and explain some of the important issues regarding its preservation in our society, which we believe you should care about. We will also try to shed some light around some of the common misunderstandings regarding these issues.

When we discuss freedom on Libervis.com (as we so often do one way or another) we are usually talking about rights people should always have and be able to exercise in any situation. In basically all cases the freedom comes down to a rather simple and easy to understand principle:


When generally talking about our community and software it builds and promotes, we use various differing terms and acronyms; "Free Software", "Open Source", "Linux", "GNU/Linux", "FOSS", "FLOSS" etc. To outsiders this may seem counterproductive because it confuses people, but in such an open and diverse community ecosystem this shouldn't come as a surprise. Various people hold various perspectives and hence form various views on issues that concern them. Some sort of a polarization is almost inevitable.


The Free Software Foundation acts as the benevolent force guiding the computer industry. It protects the users of software from the baddies, the list of which very often includes the names Microsoft, Apple, and TiVo.

But what happens when the benevolent force transforms into something of a hypocrit?


When Novell signed the now-famous agreement with Microsoft, I must admit that I was quite puzzled. For a company making most of its business by selling free and open source software, this seemed unreal; maybe there was a good reason for that, after all. But when I read the part on the patents and the indemnification of customers, I really found out that it was quite odd and contradicting anything I ever read about the GPL.

I have however refrained from giving in the Novell-bashing fashion for several reasons.