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American colloquialism

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User offline. Last seen 13 years 17 weeks ago. Offline
Joined: 2005-01-16

A question for those not living in the USA. How well do you understand colloquialism like "rose colored glasses" "devils advocate" etc. I always wonder "how they'll play in Peoria"
Are they understood in the rest of the english speaking world or should I refrain from using them for the sake of clarity?

User offline. Last seen 12 years 48 weeks ago. Offline
Joined: 2004-09-18
Re: American colloquialism

Well, USA (and other english speaking environments, but somewhat less), have had a great cultural impact to the rest of the world in various ways - through movies, music, literature ...

So, I think that most of us here whose mother tongue isn't english prefectly well understand all those expressions. At least I do, and if I don't understand something, I can always look it up in Kdict (very useful piece of software, I must say) :-).

I even think that you probably have more problems in understanding us and our bad english (no offense to anyone here) than we have in understanding native english speakers.

EDIT: I just spotted a spelling mistake Laughing

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User offline. Last seen 10 weeks 3 days ago. Offline
Joined: 2004-07-12
Re: American colloquialism

I am already pretty familiar with many of these terms, and if i am not i don't mind learning about them. I actually love english no matter it's not my native language and i don't mind these "colloquialism" terms. :-)

As stojic said, USA has made a great cultural impact to the rest of the world. We could say that every part of the world is to some degree "amreicanized". If you have a TV you have inevitably saw some cultural manifestation of USA. Most of the hit movies come from holywood, that's enough already. :-)

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User offline. Last seen 11 years 31 weeks ago. Offline
Joined: 2004-08-23
Re: American colloquialism

Literal translations of the phrases you mention are normal Dutch. I guess it's the same for other western european languages.
I wonder from which language most of these originally come. I'm guessing english (not american) and french.

User offline. Last seen 13 years 17 weeks ago. Offline
Joined: 2005-01-16
Re: American colloquialism

well in the case of rose colored glasses you would be right.

Quote:

ROSE-COLORED GLASSES - "Some unfortunate people never take their rose-colored glasses off, but everyone wears these spectacles occasionally. This attitude of cheerful optimism, of seeing everything in an attractive, pleasant light, has always been with us, while the expression itself goes back to at least 1861, when it is first recorded in 'Tom Brown at Oxford': 'Oxford was a sort of Utopia to the Captain.He continued to behold towers, and quadrangles, and chapels, through rose-colored glasses." From the "Encyclopedia of Word and Phrase Origins" by Robert Hendrickson (Facts on File, New York, 1997)

etymology is a very interesting subject

links

word origins org.
entymology online
Idiom

memenode's picture
User offline. Last seen 10 weeks 3 days ago. Offline
Joined: 2004-07-12
Re: American colloquialism
Quote:

putnameco wrote:
etymology is a very interesting subject

Yeah... there's so much interesting subjects outhere, only if you look at the world of computing, letalone all other areas. And i sometimes just wish to be able to explore them all.. but there's simply no time and energy for all of them.

Anyway.. that "rose colored glasses" term is used here in Croatia as well. We say it "ruzicaste naocale" in croatian which of course means "rose colored glasses". :-D

Thx
Dan

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