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Free Culture in China

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memenode's picture
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Joined: 2004-07-12

This is hardly anything short of alarming for freedom of speech in China: China sets new rules on Internet news

They already censore blogs and discussions and by all that Chinese internet area is becoming increasingly unfree and in the worst possible way. It is becoming a monopoly of the government itself which is to consore everything it deems harmful for itself, anything said against itself , or how they say "against national security and public interest". As they further say the news should "be directed toward serving the people and socialism and insist on correct guidance of public opinion for maintaining national and public interests."

If there is anything the modern western world learned (or should have learned) is that there simply cannot be one entity dictating what is "correct" or incorrect, what is true and what not. As soon as one entity starts effectively doing that it is inevitably affecting ones freedom to express themselves, influence other people and ultimately, to think freely.

So, what does everyone think of these developments in China? What can be done about that and are there any organizations or groups in China that are trying to battle government over this.

Of course, the best people to freely voice their opinions and share their insight on this are Chinese themselves. So, feel free to come here and voice yourself freely before Chinese government finds this site as well, and blocks it from your access.

We already have a couple of Chinese here I believe that might share a word with us.

Btw, this site is operated from Croatia and hosted on servers in Texas USA, so no relation with China and their regulations whatsoever, just to assure you. ;-)

Thank you
Daniel

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Re: Free Culture in China

well I don't think this is news anyway. Actually they have done something like this many times before :-)

I also don't think they can ever succeed with this anyway unless they ban the Internet entirely, due to the open nature of the Internet. Take the site banning as example: there are actually many ways to get around it and view "banned" sites. They also forces all Internet Cafe to install a censorship software (which is of course yet another Windows-based proprietary software). It will detect any attempt to browse sites which are supposed to be banned and report you to the police automatically. However I can get around that easily by downloading the Mozilla Firefox, because that program only checks IE :-P

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Re: Free Culture in China

Is it really that low tech, checking the address bar in IE? I thought they would log the IP addresses that request unwanted sites using the "great firewall". Maybe they do both, and the low tech approach is more practical to track down users quickly.

In any case, asking chinese their opinion about this means asking them to possibly get themselves in trouble, unless they are anonymous and outside china.

memenode's picture
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Re: Free Culture in China
Quote:

tbuitenh wrote:
Is it really that low tech, checking the address bar in IE? I thought they would log the IP addresses that request unwanted sites using the "great firewall". Maybe they do both, and the low tech approach is more practical to track down users quickly.

Don't give Chinese government any ideas. ;-)

Quote:

In any case, asking chinese their opinion about this means asking them to possibly get themselves in trouble, unless they are anonymous and outside china.

Well, first there is alot of Chinese outside of China actually and second, even though libervis requires registration for posting they can still be anonymous and no disclose any information that'll identify them as chinese... althought I know that's probably not much of a protection..

I think it's still better to invite opinions and talks on this while we still can then not do nothing at all. Those who are too afraid don't need to voice themselves, others will. It's a matter of their personal choice. But it is their freedoms that are threatened..

From what I understand from Whistlers post, it seems that all these regulations being nothing new are much of a law that isn't well enforced or just can't yet be enforced so well. Maybe it's something like the copyright law in the western world where we stil have millions and millions of people infringing by unauthorized copying, but never actually get caught because it's something that can hardly be enforced to that extent.

I imagine something similar might be happening in China. People know about the law, but still find their way around it without getting into trouble, and yes, this is internet and technology that is always hackable. A good computer user or even a programmer can probably get around anything, so much that measures to forbidd surfing certain sites and expressing certain opinions might be a piece of cake to get around for some..

Let's wish that Chinese government ultimately fails in these attempts and drops the whole thing, opening themselves entirely to become a free country. Isn't GNU/Linux doing pretty well downthere anyway? GNU/Linux is the symbol of this freedom and sounds pretty contradicting that a country that adopts GNU/Linux as a freedom giving OS, crushes freedom of speech like this.

Thanks
Daniel

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User offline. Last seen 4 years 33 weeks ago. Offline
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Re: Free Culture in China
Quote:

tbuitenh wrote:
Is it really that low tech, checking the address bar in IE? I thought they would log the IP addresses that request unwanted sites using the "great firewall". Maybe they do both, and the low tech approach is more practical to track down users quickly.

Well the program they installed at every Internet Cafe in Lanzhou only checks the IE address bar, but in the server-side blocks IP addresses (and maybe also logs your attempt to visit banned site). But this problem can be easily solved by using something like https://www.the-cloak.com (maybe they forgot to ban this anyway :-) ).

memenode's picture
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Re: Free Culture in China

Judging from this, Google is now compliant to the Chinese government in it's repression. This may certainly make things much harder on Chinese people.

Whistler, any news and changes in regard to this? Has it become harder to access outside web or is it the same?

Thanks

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Re: Free Culture in China

A little OT, but I think Google should have refused to offer service to China unless they didn't make them censor.

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memenode's picture
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Re: Free Culture in China

That's not offtopic at all. Of course it should have refused. What they are doing is absolutely crossing the line.

I am going to avoid google as much as I can from now on. Mozdex.com is a good alternative and I've been increasingly using it with enough success.

This is going to "featured news" very soon.

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User offline. Last seen 4 years 33 weeks ago. Offline
Joined: 2005-04-27
Re: Free Culture in China

well I don't actually know anything about this as the news here don't tell us about something like this...
Actually they have been c-en sor ing Google for a long time, and searching some words in Google will result not get any result.
As I asid any site ba-n-ni-ng can actually be easily cracked. But the problem will be just bigger if Google themselves decided to remove certain results Sad
Also I'm not sure if accessing Google with a U S p r o x y will be better Smiling

User offline. Last seen 4 years 33 weeks ago. Offline
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Re: Free Culture in China

a bit OT: today I'm having trouble visiting SourceForge.net to download some free software, and If I used an p-roxy it will be okay. Dunno what they want to do here.

memenode's picture
User offline. Last seen 2 days 4 hours ago. Offline
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Re: Free Culture in China

So through a proxy from outside of China you can access all of web?

I don't know what to say about them censoring sourceforge if that's what they'll do (or are doing). It is so utterly unfair.

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