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Openoffice is for auction on eBay - $61 paid already

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User offline. Last seen 7 years 26 weeks ago. Offline
Joined: 2007-02-26

I kid you not:
openoffice for sale on ebay. Clearly that kind of in your face sales copy can work.

Contrast that with the screen content shown in photos of laptops and desktops on the system76 home page, only a system error message could be more of a turn off that that sewage outlet brown. How exciting, buy this machine and you too can stare at the wallpaper. Unbelievable.

memenode's picture
User offline. Last seen 10 weeks 2 days ago. Offline
Joined: 2004-07-12
That's interesting, but if

That's interesting, but if it helps spread OpenOffice.org I am not really against it. Aside from adding "2007" to the name it doesn't seem to be hiding its true identity very much. The box seems genuine and as such might even be worth the bucks, so if anyone wants to pay as much for it, great. Smiling

There are actually people who think that a price tag on something also indicates more quality than the absence of a price tag, so even if the price is fairly low, to some people it might be better than nothing. Ironic, I know. Laughing out loud

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User offline. Last seen 10 years 4 weeks ago. Offline
Joined: 2007-09-14
Interestingly enough it also

Interestingly enough it also mentions there that the delivery will be digital, meaning the buyer will only get a download-link.
Maybe we should put up Firefox and other free stuff for sale there? And then just give them the link to the official site when they pay. ;-)

I think it's a crazy idea, but as it seems there are enough people crazy enough to fall for it.

User offline. Last seen 7 years 26 weeks ago. Offline
Joined: 2007-02-26
What are the odds, all

What are the odds, all that's being sold as "Digital delivery information" is a link to http://download.openoffice.org ?

Besides this:
"Note to Ebay: This listing complies with all US Copyright law and eBay policy on digital items, copyright, and unauthorized or replica items. This software is distributed under the LGPL license and I am authorized to sell this item. Documentation proof available upon request"
I'm not sure how the advertising standards stack up with a photo of a box and cd when that's not what you're buying, don't think it would fly in Ireland, the photo would have to have a caption highlighting that this was not the product on sale.

If the community doesn't shaft suckers like this *someone else will* - lol.

Fair point from the advocacy perspective though as well as advertising revenue.

User offline. Last seen 11 years 27 weeks ago. Offline
Joined: 2007-02-09
In the US, rapid capitalism

In the US, rapid capitalism doesn't require that the advertiser make the adverts look like the product... As long as they don't claim the advert will give them that....

For instance... If hte eBay ad doesn't SAY they get a real box and CD, they're operating just fine.

Just like commercials show 400 pound women and then show these tiny, sexy super-models who've been starving themselves for the past 4 years. The words "before" and "after" don't ALWAYS mean "this was one person before and the same person after..." if hte viewer ASSUMES the "before" and "after" are the same person... Their fault!

Capitalism sucks.

User offline. Last seen 7 years 26 weeks ago. Offline
Joined: 2007-02-26
Wow, that laxity in

Wow, that laxity in advertising standards sure takes "caveat emptor" literally.

So if you're unlucky enough to be born with a low IQ and/or were raised to be trusting then you're fair game for predators?

Life in general can be like that anyway, but this is one of those areas that legislation really can achieve more fairness. Europe has done so and it works fine, there's no disadvantage for honest business.

I guess it's just another area where the US government oligarchy never hesitate to throw ordinary decent people to the wolves, God it must be frustrating for the good people living there, software patents, aspartame, roundup, the CIA drug smuggling and private prison double act, war 'o the day, an endless diet of greed, corruption, fear, and betrayal. Poor devils.

User offline. Last seen 11 years 27 weeks ago. Offline
Joined: 2007-02-09
democrates wrote: Wow, that
'democrates' wrote:

Wow, that laxity in advertising standards sure takes "caveat emptor" literally.

I've never before seen anyone use that phrase without taking it to be an absolute truth. Thinking on it... Having seen many international commercials on YouTube I just noticed the lack of disclaimers. US commercials are full of them, actually. I seriously don't believe any human has the capacity to read that full text in the time it's displayed, but as long as it's displayed.

Granted, the vast majority of companies really DO make decent products without decieving the customer but I've found that the more "permanent" the object the bigger chance of being scammed. The notable exception to this is food, which seems to be internationally understood as being "fair game" to make it look more appealing. Ever seen the size of the Corn Pop on the box? Sticking out tongue I think this stems from a simple fact... Most people won't buy two Lexuses so once that first one is sold, even if the customer is unhappy, it's unlikely to affect future sales to this person. Corn Pops, on the other hand, need to keep people Corn Pop happy.

'democrates' wrote:

So if you're unlucky enough to be born with a low IQ and/or were raised to be trusting then you're fair game for predators?

The US caters to the lowest denominator, honestly. I don't want to say "Americans are stupid" because despite my disgust at the nation, I'm included in those stereotypes. However, McDonald's cups say VERY clearly "CAUTION: Contents are EXTREMEMLY hot!" and there was a lawsuit later when a woman spilled it in her lap (Before you say, "Oh God!"... McDonald's lost this case due to a water super-heating technique that saves then about a cent per store per day, and was the difference between pain and a red spot and the skin grafts the woman needed after the burn). While I think McDonlads was wantonly reckless... HOT COFFEE IS HOT!

Do a Google search for "Stupid Warning Labels" sometimes... I'm not sure if the PEOPLE cause the problem or if the people are the victims. "Wearing this costume does not enable the wearer to fly." is a real one, on the back of a Superman Halloween costume. I doubt that kids read those disclaimers, meaning it was aimed at the parent...

Very few American consumers are "trusting". I think to a certain extent this is beneficial though. Most people buy products on the understanding that they won't work perfectly (For instance... Light Bulbs burn out, some faster than others even though this isn't SHOWN in the commercial. Also, a toaster oven is GOING to burn some bread, even though it was that perfect colour on the box!). Most of the time, the product works well enough that the cost/usefulness ratio justifies the purchase. If it's NOT worth it, some people consider it a loss and buy different brands.

The benefit here? With low expectations it's not hard to be impressed when things actually do work well (That expensive set of knives that really DO slice through raw veggies so cleanly or that cleaner that really can get a wine stain out without discolouring the surface). Those things tend to create missionary customers and despite the shady environment PRIOR to the purchase, people feel confidant in their purchase because there are good options.

I've always wondered, seriously, with this mentality why more people don't reject Windows. Most Americans hate computers because of Windows. Perhaps it's the "magic" aspect of computers, their lack of understanding or their ideas that an OS isn't a "good" in the same sense that a bar of soap is a good. I mean, you can't return the packaging on a box of cereal for a refund so why would you try to return just the OS? Sad

'democrates' wrote:

God it must be frustrating for the good people living there

For some of us, yes. I decided many years ago that I don't belong here, so I began the emmigration process. Every day life in the US is hard for me to accept. That said, I think a LOT of people are just happy with this country. I suppose that's part of why I hate it so much... A nation of mental stagnation.

There are too many people who are brainwashed to believe that "The US is the best nation in the world" and they beleive it to their core. My own mother-in-law is one of those people.

'democrates' wrote:

software patents

People cope by dumbing down. I'm willing to bet that in a random sample of people on the street in any given metropolitan area in the US... 1 in 10 would tell you correctly what a "patent" is. Of that 10%, I'll wager 6 of those people know what "software" is. Of that remaining 6%, I'd say there's a 50/50 chance that ONE of them knows why software is best covered by copyright and not patents.

And that one person is 14 years old... Too young to vote for reform... Even if the government cared.

'democrates' wrote:

aspartame

It's safe, numerous studies have show that we'd need an IV drip of the stuff to cause any serious damage to our bodies. Even if it's not... It's damn good in my morning coffee and doesn't leave that nasty aftertaste that sugar does.

'democrates' wrote:

roundup

The weed killer? If that's what you're referring to... It's got disclaimers. Smiling

'democrates' wrote:

the CIA drug smuggling

You're misinformed SIR! The CIA has shipped their drug production/transport over to Afghanistan and devoted their efforts to torturing the "enemy combatants" in Guantanamo.

User offline. Last seen 12 years 12 weeks ago. Offline
Joined: 2007-09-24
Lots of disclaimers
Kevin Dean wrote:

Having seen many international commercials on YouTube I just noticed the lack of disclaimers. US commercials are full of them, actually. I seriously don't believe any human has the capacity to read that full text in the time it's displayed, but as long as it's displayed.

Lots of disclaimers? You mean like this: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SXoKm39vROo

memenode's picture
User offline. Last seen 10 weeks 2 days ago. Offline
Joined: 2004-07-12
Lol now that's a disclaimer.

Lol now that's a disclaimer. Laughing out loud

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User offline. Last seen 7 years 26 weeks ago. Offline
Joined: 2007-02-26
A fine reply, the disclaimer

A fine reply, the disclaimer contagion is spreading here too as people are increasingly inclined to sue. Also for financial services and the like advertisers are required to explain that terms and conditions apply, if they are regulated and so on.

Regardless of the IQ bell-curve I can't warm up to deceptive ads, but don't worry, I won't have an episode in a burger joint like Mr. Douglass in "Falling Down" :-) Gas movie, not as good as shawshank redemption or the green mile but still a watcher.

The safety of Aspartame is still debated, there are lots of studies but given that over 90% of industry funded studies accross the board find the industry product safe whereas independent studies have a dramatically lower pass rate, you have to be sceptical. FDA rejected aspartame (once on a WWII shortlist of candidate chemo-weapons) for ten years based on all studies, the day after Reagan got in he appointed Rumsfeld over the FDA, Rummy replaced FDA rejecters with supporters, they selected only supportive studies as the basis for assessment and hey presto approved Aspartame.

I keep an open mind. My mother was on those sweeteners for decades and died last year from pancreatic cancer following the onset of diabetes. Her sugar system was shot and that controversial ingredient was in the vicinity. It's not proof and one anecdote doesn't make the general case it's true, but if it transpires that this is another big tobacco style cover-up I suspect a lot of people will be out for blood, starting with Rumsfelds.

Spot on with Roundup the pesticide, just another nightmare brought to you by Monsanto, and if you read some of this you start to wonder if the disclaimers are enough.

I forgot about Afghanistan, yes the war on drugs was to get a boost but lo! opium plantations there are now producing at record highs. I for one will buy the ineptitude defense hook line and sinker just like I do for the 2.3 Trillion dollars Rumsfeld announced the day before 9/11 was missing from the DOD books, this isn't as easy as landing a man on the moon after all and sure the farmers helping the Taliban are probably getting better poppy yields now by using roundup...

I was confused there for a bit, still reeling from "Dillon Read Inc. and the Aristocracy of Stock Profits" really, but that's old news now and I'm sure most of it is lies and sour grapes. You've got to love the conspiracy theorists, but not that much, cost me a packet to remove that "puff of smoke on the grassy knoll" tatoo - lol.

User offline. Last seen 11 years 27 weeks ago. Offline
Joined: 2007-02-09
My aspertame comment was

My aspertame comment was more along the lines of smoking. Smiling I quit smoking about 8 months ago and haven't looked back, but frankly, I hate all of the stupid campaigns about non-smoking. I KNEW when I started smoking that it was unhealthy. I KNOW today that being fat is dangerous. It doesn't matter to me if tomorrow I learn that aspertame causes cancer... It's my body and I think I should make that call, not a government telling me, quite literally, what I can't put in my coffee. Smiling

I no longer believe in conspiracy stories... I think the evil-doers in the world have enough power not to be openly evil.

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